How to make an idea stick?

Problem Statement: We have ideas but we tend to express in a contextual manner.

1- We need to get through the right people

2- We need to have a sticking factor to it, It sounds like a bulb that lights up and brightens up the whole region.

3- The context in which it is understood

Chip and Den Heath, came up with a phenomenon to investigate the sticking of ideas. In other words, they needed to understand why some ideas have a direct impact while others do not.

It is the same issue that the training fraternity. The content and context of the training modules remain missing.

Chip and Den Heath explains a stepped framework to deal with such an issue.

SIMPLE

The core idea behind the aspect simple is to make sure that your core is understood. There is a rule that it needs to be profound that an individual can spend a lifetime in it.

UNEXPECTED

One needs to create curiosity but it should never be confusing. One good example can be taken from the invention and the name of the technology ‘walkman’. It is clear from the name of the invention that an individual will be holding it while walking. It does create the curiosity as to how it may work, but it does not confuse the listeners.

CONCRETNESS

Whatever the idea that you are expressing, one needs to be aware that it gives a clear idea. For instance, if you utter an ice-filled-bath tub, people will not give a second thought about it when they will have a clear idea.

CREDIBILITY

One can never show the worth of a statement until it has been given out with credibility. A good quote that sums up the concept really well is from Ronald Reigns who stated, “Before you vote, ask yourself if you are better off today than you were four years ago”.

EMOTIONS

You need to get people care about the idea. However, the right kind of emotions are needed. You can never make a person quit by scaring them about the fear of death, but rather by resonating them with the facts.

STORY

You need to have story behind your idea. All good trainers are storytellers. It adds experience to the idea. The firefighters, for example, share their experience when they save lives. It helps them understand the agility of their working scheme. You have a rich and complete mental catalogue for critical situations.

Reference: Chip and Den Heath, Made to Stick Page numbers 16-17